Hypnosis Depot

From Victim to Victor: Overcoming Childhood Sexual Abuse

Part Four: Google's Fight

Cybertip is Canada's National Tipline for reporting the online sexual exploitation of children. It is a centralized web portal for receiving and addressing reports from the public regarding child pornography, luring, child sex tourism, and children who are exploited through prostitution. Cybertip

Google is battling online child abuse. [Attempts to reach Jacquelline Fuller, head of Google's charity arm Google.org, -- even through Facebook and Linked-In -- to update her article, were unsuccessful]. In 2011, reports Google, "the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children's (NCMEC's) Cybertipline received 17.3 million images and videos of suspected child abuse. This is four times more than what their Exploited Children's Division (ECD) saw in 2007. And the number is still growing. Behind these images are real, vulnerable kids who are sexually victimized and victimized further through the distribution of their images."

Google continues: "It is critical that we take action as a community -- as concerned parents, guardians, teachers and companies -- to help combat this problem.

Child sexual exploitation is a global problem that needs a global solution. More than half of the images and videos reported to NCMEC are from outside of the U.S. With this in mind, we need to sustain and encourage borderless communication between organizations fighting this problem on the ground. For example, NCMEC’s CyberTipline is accessible to 60 countries, helping local law enforcement agencies effectively execute their investigations.

Google has been working on fighting child exploitation since as early as 2006 when we joined the Technology Coalition, teaming up with other tech industry companies to develop technical solutions. Since then, we've been providing software and hardware to helping organizations all around the world to fight child abuse images on the web and help locate missing children.

There is much more that can be done, and Google is taking our commitment another step further through a $5 million effort to eradicate child abuse imagery online. Part of this commitment will go to global child protection partners like the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children and the Internet Watch Foundation. We're providing additional support to similar heroic organizations in the U.S., Canada, Europe, Australia and Latin America.

Since 2008, we’ve used "hashing" technology to tag known child sexual abuse images, allowing us to identify duplicate images which may exist elsewhere. Each offending image in effect gets a unique ID that our computers can recognize without humans having to view them again. Recently, we've started working to incorporate encrypted 'fingerprints' of child sexual abuse images into a cross-industry database. This will enable companies, law enforcement and charities to better collaborate on detecting and removing these images, and to take action against the criminals. We've also announced a $2 million Child Protection Technology Fund to encourage the development of ever more effective tools.

We're in the business of making information widely available, but there's certain 'information' that should never be created or found. We can do a lot to ensure it's not available online -- and that when people try to share this disgusting content they are caught and prosecuted."

[The Official Google Blog from which the above was excerpted was posted by Jacquelline Fuller, Director, Google Giving].

==========================