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There is a secret you should know about hypnosis inductions

All hypnotists know the secret but rarely speak about it.

That secret is revealed in my ebook:

With this ebook you can quickly learn how to help people overcome a variety of problems such as exam anxiety, lack of confidence, bad habits and phobias by amplifying their creativity through the power of their imaginations.

Only $1.99 U.S.

Here's an excerpt:

The common elements of all inductions are:

  • narrowing of attention
  • use of the imagination
  • physical relaxation

If the person you're about to hypnotize has no previous experience with hypnosis almost anything you suggest will be accepted as normal.

If, however, he or she has been previously hypnotized they will expect a similar induction to what they're used to.

Like the new client who stormed out of my office because I didn't offer her earphones, classical music and a recliner.

Seems her previous hypnotherapist had used that approach and "that's how you do hypnosis!"

Inductions can be grouped into four categories:

  • verbal
  • mechanical
  • physical
  • electronic

. . . .

Verbal Hypnotic Inductions

The spoken word is the most common way to induce hypnosis. And almost any words will do. Although of course, usually you'd emphasize relaxation. Here are some typical examples of verbal inductions:

Deep breathing

Breathing slowly and deeply counteracts anxiety -- and can induce the hypnotic state. So, telling someone to enjoy slow deep breathing can be an induction in itself, or an adjunct to another induction of your choice.

We're referring here to really deep and really slow breathing. Anything less and you could bring on a panic attack.

Similarly, focusing on their breathing can be an induction in itself.

Special Place

Before starting the hypnotic process you ask the person in what kind of imaginary place he or she would feel "calm, confident, relaxed and strong."

Common responses are "the beach," "a meadow", "in the mountains." But some are unusual. Such as, "Flying like Peter Pan", "sitting on a bus" or "stretched out on a hammock."

The reason you ask for an imaginary place is that real places have connotations that might derail your hypnotizee from focusing on your suggestions.

Counting

One of the simplest (and the first method I learned) is simply to count. Usually downward.

[Conversely, then, to disengage from hypnosis, you would count upward].

The count can be straightforward, i.e., "ten-nine-eight-seven-six-five-four-three-two-one" said out loud or in your head, or complex: "beginning at 100, subtract 3 -- 97, 94, 91, 88, 85, 82 . . . . "

If you use a complex countdown, be sure to tell the person "if you lose track, simply start over."

Counting can also be interspersed with suggestions of relaxation:

"Ten--becoming more and more relaxed--nine--feeling very comfortable and relaxed--eight--continuing to breathe slowly and deeply--seven--with each slow, deep breath allowing yourself to drift deeper and deeper into a very pleasant state of relaxation--six--every part of you deeply relaxed now--five--allowing yourself, if you wish, to drift even deeper and deeper--four--letting any remaining tension just drain away--three--with each slow, deep breath allowing yourself to drift deeper and deeper into a very pleasant state of relaxation--two--allowing yourself to feel completely comfortable, safe and relaxed--and---one."

Confusion The purpose of this technique is to so confuse the hypnotizee that he or she gives up conscious fears or questions -- and slips into hypnosis.

Confusion can be created by asking the person to do several things at once (e.g., slow deep breathing, imagining their Special Place, and repeating your relaxation suggestions in their head).

Or two hypnotists, seated on either side of the person, could speak simultaneously.

. . . .

Eye Fixation

This is one of the oldest induction techniques.

Its most famous example is the swinging watch. But any object will do. Even the person's finger held at arm's length.

The individual to be hypnotized stares at the object until he or she relaxes into hypnosis. Staring at a candle or a spot on the wall or indeed at any object, can induce hypnosis. People with a good talent for hypnosis can be induced by staring into a penlight. And some hypnotists (again those who are more likely to lean toward the authoritarian approach) favour using their own eyes as the fixation point.

Sometimes I've even used a small rock that has the word "IMAGINE" inscribed in it.

Eye Blink

Another name for the Rapid Eye Flutter induction.

Rapid Eye Flutter

This induction has ancient roots. It is part distraction, part physiological and part authoritarian.

The Rapid Eye Flutter is useful with clients who:

  • have difficulty with voluntary focusing, or
  • who like to be told what to do or
  • who have a tendency to overanalyse, or
  • who are in a hurry.

Because of its comparative swiftness, this is a handy induction when you want to guide someone quickly into hypnosis.

After your pre-talk, you can begin by encouraging the person to breathe slowly and deeply. Then rapidly tell him or her, "Close your eyes, open your eyes, close, open, close, open. . . ."

As you continue this, slip in such suggestions (commands?) as

  • "soon your eyes will be too heavy to open,"
  • "your eyes become so heavy you can't open them",
  • "so pleasant when they're closed",
  • "so tightly shut now that you can't be bothered to open them",
  • "so tight you can't open them no matter how much you try".
  • And/or "the harder you try to open the eyes the more they stay shut.

For details on many more inductions, (including Progressive Relaxation, Repeat, Commanding, Permissive, Ideomotor, The Inner Search, The Elevator) and to find out when NOT to use the most popular hypnotic induction go to

With this ebook you can quickly learn how to help people overcome a variety of problems such as exam anxiety, lack of confidence, bad habits and phobias by amplifying their creativity through the power of their imaginations.

Only $1.99 U.S.

That's the same awesome ebook in which you can discover the surprising secret about hypnotic inductions. And save $25.


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